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BRUSSELS TRANSPORT - TRANSPORT IN BRUSSELS BELGIUM

Brussels TransportMain Line Trains - There are three main train stations, Gare Du Midi (South Station), Gare Du Central (Central Station-a five minute walk from Grand’ Place), and Gare Du Noir (Central North) which are quite a convenient way to get around Brussels. Gare Du Midi is the main train station with international connections: the Eurostar and Thalys fast trains stop here. Some International trains stop at Gare Du Midi and Gare Du Central as well. Brussels is also connected to other cities within Belgium such as Antwerp, Bruges, Ghent, Leuven, Mechelen, Ostend Ypres, and Zaventrum Airport.

Brussels Metro

The Brussels Métro started in 1969 and now has three main lines with some metro stations and tunnels are also used by trams. All the stations are one layer below the street and can be easily reached. See map below. These trains are a great way to get around within Brussels – there are several convenient Metro stops and you’re sure to find one nearby wherever you are. Make sure to bring a metro map or you can pick one up at any of the Metro on main train stations. Tickets are inexpensive and can be purchased at metro stations from a ticket seller or ticket machines at metro stations. The cost of a single ride is about €1.50, a ten ride ticket is about €10 while a full day ticket is €3.80 (very useful for sightseers. At weekends slightly different arrangements work for the one day ticket so ask at your hotel or at the tourist office. You will recognise the Metro stations by a big blue M outside.

You can also use a Brussels Card - you get free public transport and you can get into to most museums for free. It's a three day card and you get a a guide with it. This card also gets you a 25% reduction for a mussels restaurant and on the blue double decker buses. You can buy the Brussels Card at tourist info offices, most hotels and also at some museums. It costs about €30 - €35 for the three days and is well worth it if you are going to several museums.

Buses and Trams

The trams of Brussels used to trundle along majestically around the city but now have been replaced by sleek new trams. There are 16 routes. There are over 40 local bus routes so getting around Brussels is never a problem.

Car

If you decide to drive, be aware that the drivers in Brussels are speedsters and rarely stop for pedestrians crossing streets. So if you are footing it (which you will be once you get off the metro) be careful and don’t expect traffic to be hospitable to you. On the other hand, if you drive – you can explore outer areas of Brussels and the countryside of Brussels and other spots more freely (though the train does take you to major Belgium cities and some smaller ones). You must have your passport, driving license, and vehicle registration documents. In Brussels the ‘Right of Way” rule is different and it’s important that you remember this in order to avoid an accident. Cars coming out of side roads sometimes have the right away – not the main road. And then other times the main road has the right away - just take care!